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Commodore Amiga 1200

Commodore Amiga 1200

Speed14.32 MHz
Memory2 MB

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Commodore

Amiga

Release Date: 1/10/1992
Manufacturer: Commodore
Original Retail Price:
Adjusted Inflation Price:
$799.00
$1,359.83*
 
One of the last powerful "all in one" units ever made, the Amiga 1200 contained 2MB of RAM and an advanced graphics chip named "AGA". Mostly backwards compatible with earlier Amiga models, the 1200 included the third generation of the Amiga OS and contained many powerful easy to use features. It was possible to build a hard drive right into the unit (as seen here). Its bigger brother (the 4000) was used primarily for video production. The initial price was $799 US dollars and the machine still has great value today in North America as most machines were sold in the UK.

User Comments
Anonymous on Saturday, August 15, 2015
Amiga 1200 was the most advanced Amiga and definitive favorite of mines. By the time of release, Amiga was already behind its competitors and sadly failed to recapture market lead. I wished A1200 kept pace, but decisions by Commodore on the basis of economics and infighting between management and design teams crippled what ought to have been a superior product advancing Amiga product line like at Apple if design team won out Amiga could have survived longer. It is possible to 'upgrade' some of its failings. At the time it was more common to find in other computers (Atari Falcon 040, Apple Macintosh IIvx, IBM PC and compatibles): 3.5" HD floppy disk drives (1.76 MB capacity on A4000), 16-bit Sound (SoundBlaster 16 [SB16] launched on IBM PC clones in June 1992, 5 months before A1200) and CD-ROM drives. Delays releasing CD-ROM drives in fear of harming Amiga CD32 sales hindered CD format adoption as increasingly software and games were coming out on that medium with less piracy and lower production costs over floppy disks. Had Commodore taken note of changing trends, it could have stood a chance.
Len McBurnie on Wednesday, September 26, 2012
I bought one of these when they first came out and still have it. Today I mostly use it to put titles on DVD's that I shoot for some local theatre groups (using the program Scala MM400).
Frank Biekart on Thursday, August 04, 2011
Fantastic machine. I bought one back in the summer of 98. I had an Appolo accelerator board in it with a total of I think 40mghtz speed and 64 megs of ram. For net surfing I had it hooked up to a GVC 56k fax modem. It was so fast it burned out the old copper phone cables in my parents house and BBS system ops used to ask what I was using. It blew them away.
Frank Biekart on Thursday, August 04, 2011
This computer was simply amazing. It was probably the best computer I ever owned. I bought mine back in the summer of 98. Its standard processor speed was 14mghz with 2mb of ram. I upraded mine with an Appolo 040 accelerator board and the speed on this system was just awesome. I could swera it gave this computer a performance that could rival a pentium with far better graphics. Its also the first the first computer I surfed the internet with. I had it hooked up to a GVC external 56k fax modem, and the thing was so fast it burned out the old copper wires in my parents house. I once logged into a local BBS and the system operator was so impressed with the speed he asked me what computer and modem I was using. My answer shocked him. LOL Not to mention all the software and text files I downloaded with this incredible machine.
Todd H on Wednesday, March 14, 2007
The Amiga 1200 was my second Amiga (the 500 was the first). I remember taking it to the Amiga users group at the University of Georgia back in the early 90's right after buying it to show it off. To this day it still remains my favorite computer of all time. Fantastic machine. I wish I hadn't sold it all those years ago.
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* Inflation data courtesy of www.inflationdata.com. Values are approximate using our own calculations.