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Timex Sinclair 1000

Timex Sinclair 1000

Speed3.25 MHz
Memory2 KB

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Timex

Release Date: 7/1/1982
Manufacturer: Timex
Original Retail Price:
Adjusted Inflation Price:
$99.00
$244.96*
 
Donated By: N. Beach
 
The US version of the ZX-81 manufactured by Timex. The biggest difference between this machine and the ZX-81 is that it featured 2K of RAM (and this machine is also equipped with a 16K RAM booster). The Sinclair machines were truly an affordable machine for the masses, and this one was no exception with it’s list price being a mere $99 back in 1982. The thermal printer add-on featured here was available as well as a tape cassette interface for storing programs. The 1000 used Sinclair BASIC where all of the commands were available from the keyboard (and in fact had to be activated from the keyboard) which was a low cost membrane type. Surprisingly functional regardless of its limitations.

Timex 1016 16K RAM Expansion

Timex 1016 16K RAM Expansion
Release Date: 7/1/1982
 
Donated By: N. Beach
 
The TS 1016 is a 16K RAM expansion module, fitted externally to the TS 1000. It is known for the infamous RAM pack wobble which made the computer crash if it was so much as nudged. Timex experienced major problems in supplying the TS 1016, and was unable to make it available in any great numbers for two or three months after the launch of the 1000.

Timex 2040 Thermal Printer

Timex 2040 Thermal Printer
Release Date: 1/1/1983
 
Donated By: N. Beach
 
The 2040 is a small thermal printer, requiring thermal paper (similar to the old fax machine paper rolls). It is a 32 column line printer. It is compatible with all Timex Sinclair computer busses, including the Spectrum bus. Printing was a matter of using Sinclair BASIC commands LPRINT and LLIST to perform direct output to the printer, and COPY did a screen dump.

User Comments
Harry A. Madden on Thursday, August 13, 2015
I purchased a Timex Sinclair 1000 back around 1982 or so. It was my first computer purchase (and all I could afford). At the time, I was a mechanical engineer working for Westinghouse Marine Division on the design for a launch tube for the MX (Peacekeeper) ICBM. We had a particularly knotty problem manufacturing an exotic but very necessary screw and matching "nut" with an extremely high lead angle as part of the project. All the conventional machinist's formulas (i.e., Machinist's Handbook, etc.) to build parts that mated didn't work. After a lot of research, I found a system devised by a Professor Vogel back during WW2 for calculating and measuring pitch diameters for any screw thread or gear. However, the method required access to a table of "involute" functions that Vogel (and a herd of grad students) had developed. I didn't have it, but (and here's where it gets relevant to this thread) I was able to program an iterative solution to the problem using the Timex Sinclair! Punch in the variables, and hit ENTER, and after grinding away for several hours, it presented the user with the necessary dimensions for a machinist to manufacture the matching screw/nut set. Before the Timex, no one was able build it, and afterwards, we had several competing machine shops able to produce the parts. So, the Timex Sinclair, toy though it might be, actually performed important engineering calculations that contributed to the defense of the USA! (Actually, I still have it, along with it's thermal printer, a Radio Shack casette deck that interfaced with it, the 16 K memory add-on, and several programming books for it. I would imagine it would still work if I needed it. Not likely, of course, given the assortment of much newer and more powerful machines at my disposal. Still, at the time, it was just the cutting edge technology I needed.)
Harry A. Madden on Thursday, August 13, 2015
I purchased a Timex Sinclair 1000 back around 1982 or so. It was my first computer purchase (and all I could afford). At the time, I was a mechanical engineer working for Westinghouse Marine Division on the design for a launch tube for the MX (Peacekeeper) ICBM. We had a particularly knotty problem manufacturing an exotic but very necessary screw and matching "nut" with an extremely high lead angle as part of the project. All the conventional machinist's formulas (i.e., Machinist's Handbook, etc.) to build parts that mated didn't work. After a lot of research, I found a system devised by a Professor Vogel back during WW2 for calculating and measuring pitch diameters for any screw thread or gear. However, the method required access to a table of "involute" functions that Vogel (and a herd of grad students) had developed. I didn't have it, but (and here's where it gets relevant to this thread) I was able to program an iterative solution to the problem using the Timex Sinclair! Punch in the variables, and hit ENTER, and after grinding away for several hours, it presented the user with the necessary dimensions for a machinist to manufacture the matching screw/nut set. Before the Timex, no one was able build it, and afterwards, we had several competing machine shops able to produce the parts. So, the Timex Sinclair, toy though it might be, actually performed important engineering calculations that contributed to the defense of the USA! (Actually, I still have it, along with it's thermal printer, a Radio Shack casette deck that interfaced with it, the 16 K memory add-on, and several programming books for it. I would imagine it would still work if I needed it. Not likely, of course, given the assortment of much newer and more powerful machines at my disposal. Still, at the time, it was just the cutting edge technology I needed.)
Gary M on Monday, May 5, 2014
My first computer was a full-blown Timex-Sinclair with the RAM pack, printer and a full-sized keyboard; the 8K BASIC interpreter was pretty amazing for 8K, but this machine really soared when you swapped in a 8K FORTH ROM. I wrote an astronomical calculator program that so impressed a friend working at the Bank of Montreal, that next thing I knew I was coding on an Osborne for Domestic Investments! My brother later adapted the Timex with a battery-pack and LCD screen built into an attaché case, creating a functional laptop ;)
Bill on Tuesday, March 11, 2014
This was my first computer. I was a student in high school and I ordered it from the Popular Mechanics Magazine. I spent so many hours typing in Basic programs that my fingers would start to get uncomfortably warm from the keys on the keyboard. I remember that I had to consider how many pages of Basic that I would type because if it was too many the computer would freeze up and I would lose all my work.
Gord K on Wednesday, November 13, 2013
I have a Timex Sinclair 1000 Personal Computer with the 16 RAM Module, several program tapes and How to Books on using the computer. Included is the Timex Sinclair 2040 Printer all still in the original packaging with manuals. I wish to sell the whole package, make me an offer. Gord K at 416 503-1483 in Toronto Canada.
Dane S on Tuesday, June 12, 2012
One of my very first computers. Tiny little keyboard and memory pack. I believe I payed close to $100.00 for the TS-1000 and another $49.00 for the 16k Rampack in 1982. Of course you had to have a cassette player to load all of the programs into the TS-1000. I always had around three cassette players around, so I could get the progam to load. A lot of the time, they didn't right away. Good learning computer for it's time
EC on Wednesday, April 25, 2012
I remember about 1984 or 85, Consumers Distributing (in Canada) was blowing them out the door at $29.99. I called every store and they were sold out, I finally found one and picked it up.
Steve on Saturday, April 14, 2012
The TS 1000 was too my first computer. Shortly after it's purchase, I bought the 16K Ram Pack; my first computer upgrade! Well, the Ram Module socket was unpredictable and weak, so I ordered the fancy 'Ram Pack securing device' from a vendor advertising in the Timex Sinclair 1000 User magazine. I paid 5 USD for that device and received one very large rubber band in the mail. The 'device' stretched around the entire edge of the Timex and Ram Pack, holding the Pack in place. Five bucks for that!!... why didn't I think of that!
Peter Homme on Thursday, July 21, 2011
I remember getting one of these when they came out. The first thing I did was to wire a DB15 connector on the back and I rewired a surplus keyboard to plug into it. It was a bit of work, but it worked out in the end and I did it for a couple of friends as well. We used to go to "Active Surplus" on Queen street in Toronto for all the spare bits we needed.
Joe on Sunday, January 4, 2009
Also my first computer .... and actually used it for interest calculations at a company I worked for (wrote a basic program as opposed to having to do to the work by hand!). The keyboard was an aggravation but considering its price ... it was a great buy! (I wish I still had it!)
Jeff Robbins on Saturday, July 21, 2007
Had one of these too, until the dimple type keyboard keys stopped working, one at a time!
Jay M. on Wednesday, July 18, 2007
The Timex Sinclair 1000 was my first computer and introduced me to the world of programming and computers in general. Countless hours were spent playing and creating games and programs in BASIC and even assembly language in an effort to squeeze every ounce of performance from this wondrous machine. No matter how much computer technology advances, the TS1000 will always be my favorite.
John Van Ostrand on Tuesday, November 21, 2006
This was my first computer. I was a young teenager with a keen interest in computers but I didn't have a job or the money to purchase one. The Timex Sinclair was a present from my mother. She received it as a gift from a bank for opening an account (remember those days,) which she did deliberatly just for the computer. This was the system that taught me BASIC. BASIC commands were entered by pressing key combinations. I recall that each of the keys on the keyboard also had BASIC commands. Pressing a BASIC keyword "shift" button would access these keywords. I also recall that it stored the BASIC keywords as single bytes. It effectivey pre-tokenized the program.
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* Inflation data courtesy of www.inflationdata.com. Values are approximate using our own calculations.